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Electrochromic Printing Inks Based on Oxidative Aromatization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047447D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Balanson, RD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Two important requirements of electrochromic printing materials are: (1) they oxidize or reduce to highly colored stable dye systems, and (2) in areas where they are not electrochemically written, no background coloration appears. Examples of systems which meet both requirements are dihydro or tetrahydro aromatic substances. When electrochemically oxidized, these materials become colored, stable aromatic substances. When designed correctly, the aromatic product will have a high extinction coefficient in the visible portion of the spectrum, while the reduced form, being non-conjugated, will have no color. The material can be designed such that the oxidation potential is high enough that it will not react with molecular oxygen to form the colored state. Specific examples of such materials are the dihydro-tetrazine I and II.

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Electrochromic Printing Inks Based on Oxidative Aromatization

Two important requirements of electrochromic printing materials are: (1) they oxidize or reduce to highly colored stable dye systems, and (2) in areas where they are not electrochemically written, no background coloration appears. Examples of systems which meet both requirements are dihydro or tetrahydro aromatic substances. When electrochemically oxidized, these materials become colored, stable aromatic substances. When designed correctly, the aromatic product will have a high extinction coefficient in the visible portion of the spectrum, while the reduced form, being non-conjugated, will have no color. The material can be designed such that the oxidation potential is high enough that it will not react with molecular oxygen to form the colored state. Specific examples of such materials are the dihydro-tetrazine I and II.

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Both of these materials have been used to write on paper electrochemically. The points where the electrode comes in contact with the paper become bright red, while the background remains colorless.

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