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Triarylamines for Electrochemical Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047448D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jones, CR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Electrochemical printing technology requires the development of inks that (1) are darkly colored when printed, (2) colorless (develop no background - do not discolor) until electrochemically addressed, (3) print instantly and (4) print at reasonably low potentials. Current work is directed toward developing a variety of colors as well as black. Many materials that print either develop background, fade with age, and/or print slowly. It has now been found that triarylamines give stable dark brown or gray print that does not develop background, nor fade, and prints fast and at moderate potentials. The figure below illustrates the general structure of the materials. (Image Omitted) The table on the next page describes the derivatives prepared, the electrolyte used as oxidant, and the printing observations.

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Triarylamines for Electrochemical Printing

Electrochemical printing technology requires the development of inks that (1) are darkly colored when printed, (2) colorless (develop no background - do not discolor) until electrochemically addressed, (3) print instantly and (4) print at reasonably low potentials. Current work is directed toward developing a variety of colors as well as black. Many materials that print either develop background, fade with age, and/or print slowly. It has now been found that triarylamines give stable dark brown or gray print that does not develop background, nor fade, and prints fast and at moderate potentials. The figure below illustrates the general structure of the materials.

(Image Omitted)

The table on the next page describes the derivatives prepared, the electrolyte used as oxidant, and the printing observations. All initial tests were done by dissolving the colorless form of the dye in acetone, coating the paper, and then writing with an oxidized form of the electrolyte (either Br3/H2O or Ce(IV)). Actual writing experiments (with an electrode pen) were performed in those cases which looked particularly promising (++), and the results are consistent with the initial screening observations. In all cases where printing was observed, it was observed instantaneously. All fade and background observations were made on printed papers exposed to ambient conditions (oxygen, humidity and fluorescent lighting) for a minimum of two weeks. Of p...