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Sublimable Dye Transfer Layer for Resistive Ribbon Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047449D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crooks, W: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Resistive ribbon print is obtained by passing current through a resistive layer, thereby creating sufficient heat to melt and transfer a thermally sensitive ink layer. Due to the melting of the layer, complete transfer is achieved which causes the ribbon to be limited to a single use configuration. We have found that by mixing a sublimable dye in a suitable binder such as cellulose nitrate, a ribbon can be fabricated which has multi-use capabilities. The ribbon and the method by which print was obtained are detailed below. The formulation consists of: 10.5 grams Sublimable Print Black 1.5 grams Nitrocellulose 59.5 grams Methyl Ethyl Ketone 10.

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Sublimable Dye Transfer Layer for Resistive Ribbon Printing

Resistive ribbon print is obtained by passing current through a resistive layer, thereby creating sufficient heat to melt and transfer a thermally sensitive ink layer. Due to the melting of the layer, complete transfer is achieved which causes the ribbon to be limited to a single use configuration. We have found that by mixing a sublimable dye in a suitable binder such as cellulose nitrate, a ribbon can be fabricated which has multi-use capabilities. The ribbon and the method by which print was obtained are detailed below. The formulation consists of: 10.5 grams Sublimable Print Black

1.5 grams Nitrocellulose

59.5 grams Methyl Ethyl

Ketone

10.5 grams Ethanol. The mixture was dissolved and coated onto a stainless steel surface. The reverse side of the stainless steel surface had previously been coated with a resistive layer of approximately 400 L/ sheet resistivity. Final dry thickness of the transfer layer was 2 microns. Print was obtained on a drum robot at 100 milliamps and 10 inches/ second. A second piece of paper was printed at the same conditions and over the previously printed ribbon area, demonstrating a second use capability.

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