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Drop-On-Demand Ink Jet Printing Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047452D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chai, HD: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

A drop-on-demand printing method is described in which the ink is separated into two parts, one of which is coated onto the print sheet prior to printing and the other is projected by a drop-on-demand print head in the image configuration onto the print sheet for printing. The formulation of drop-on-demand inks is difficult because of several conflicting requirements relating to controlled penetration into the print sheet, without feathering, bleedthrough or smearing. These requirements can be met by dividing the components of the ink into two solutions. One solution contains a colorless derivative of the dye, or of one component of the dye system, together with stabilizers and other colorless components of the ultimate ink which can be conveniently coated onto paper.

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Drop-On-Demand Ink Jet Printing Method

A drop-on-demand printing method is described in which the ink is separated into two parts, one of which is coated onto the print sheet prior to printing and the other is projected by a drop-on-demand print head in the image configuration onto the print sheet for printing. The formulation of drop-on-demand inks is difficult because of several conflicting requirements relating to controlled penetration into the print sheet, without feathering, bleedthrough or smearing. These requirements can be met by dividing the components of the ink into two solutions. One solution contains a colorless derivative of the dye, or of one component of the dye system, together with stabilizers and other colorless components of the ultimate ink which can be conveniently coated onto paper. There is no requirement that this solution be of high viscosity although the solution is not restricted to low viscosities. The second solution then contains an oxidizing agent, and thickeners as required, to produce on the previously coated paper, a desired image when projected by a drop-on-demand print head. An example of such a system uses a partially reduced pyrrole oligomer as the leucodye, additionally inhibited to produce a coated paper with no background. The second solution comprises hydrogen peroxide, dilute acetic or phosphoric acid and methylcellulose to thicken the solution to the proper viscosity range. A second example utilizes a first solution h...