Browse Prior Art Database

Tape Tension Detection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047473D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dang, CT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes light probe and a vacuum cell detect tape tension. Three modes of operation are shown employing light probes to detect the distance from the probe to the tape 10 as it is drawn into the vacuum cell 11. The vacuum is maintained essentially constant in the vacuum cell, and the tape is drawn down more as the tension lessens. In the external arrangement of Fig. 1, a light probe 12 is projected toward the cell. Such light probes and sensors use fiber optics to project light towards an object and measure the reflected intensity to detect the distance to the object. Here, the intensity is directly related to the tension. In the internal arrangement of Fig. 2, the intensity is inversely related to the tension, and in the differential arrangement of Fig. 3, the positive signal is directly related to the tension.

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Tape Tension Detection

This article describes light probe and a vacuum cell detect tape tension. Three modes of operation are shown employing light probes to detect the distance from the probe to the tape 10 as it is drawn into the vacuum cell 11. The vacuum is maintained essentially constant in the vacuum cell, and the tape is drawn down more as the tension lessens. In the external arrangement of Fig. 1, a light probe 12 is projected toward the cell. Such light probes and sensors use fiber optics to project light towards an object and measure the reflected intensity to detect the distance to the object. Here, the intensity is directly related to the tension. In the internal arrangement of Fig. 2, the intensity is inversely related to the tension, and in the differential arrangement of Fig. 3, the positive signal is directly related to the tension.

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