Browse Prior Art Database

Self-Adjusting Impact Probe

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047586D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-07
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chirico, C: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The Self-Adjusting Impact Probe (SAP) provides a tool with the ability to automatically adjust the result force impact of a tool onto an object. The SAP System is illustrated in brief detail in Fig. 1. The SAP System employs a force transducer which provides an electrical signal to a controller. This electrical signal describes the physical interaction of a probe onto the subject. The controller responds to the electrical signal in a manner to provide information to the user. The user can then decide what response is needed to alter (or not to alter) the interaction of a tool on a subject. An example of how the SAP System may be employed is illustrated in Fig. 2. The system is that of chip placement, where the tool is a chip-placement machine, and the subject is a chip (semiconductor device). In the case of Fig.

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Self-Adjusting Impact Probe

The Self-Adjusting Impact Probe (SAP) provides a tool with the ability to automatically adjust the result force impact of a tool onto an object. The SAP System is illustrated in brief detail in Fig. 1. The SAP System employs a force transducer which provides an electrical signal to a controller. This electrical signal describes the physical interaction of a probe onto the subject. The controller responds to the electrical signal in a manner to provide information to the user. The user can then decide what response is needed to alter (or not to alter) the interaction of a tool on a subject. An example of how the SAP System may be employed is illustrated in Fig. 2. The system is that of chip placement, where the tool is a chip-placement machine, and the subject is a chip (semiconductor device). In the case of Fig. 2, the force transducer provides an electrical signal which is amplified and converted to digital data. The data is then fed into a processor which identifies the interaction of probe and chip and decides on the action to take. The action taken may be to adjust the velocity, and/or acceleration, and/or probe height. The action is inputted to a driver (control) which controls the motor velocity, acceleration and positioning. The SAP System allows automatic and continuous monitoring of the impact force during tool operation, without the need of manual periodic checking of the force. Excessive force may inflict quartz cracking and...