Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Coupling to a Product for Basic Assurance Test Analysis

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047706D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Loiselle, JT: AUTHOR

Abstract

Many electronic products today have built-in diagnostic tests to detect faulty components or operations. Many of these tests are run just after power has been turned on. These tests exercise the major components in the product, and are known as basic assurance tests (BATs). If a BAT failure occurs, the failing test is identified with a certain light pattern on the product's message indicator panel. The above method may be improved, particularly if a product has only 1 or 2 indicator lights. The method described here requires that the product have a minimum of one LED (light-emitting diode) indicator 10 (this light could even be the "power on" indicator) and that it be optically coupled to a "test result analyzer". This analyzer could be on the production line or a servicing tool for field repair used as shown in the figure.

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Method of Coupling to a Product for Basic Assurance Test Analysis

Many electronic products today have built-in diagnostic tests to detect faulty components or operations. Many of these tests are run just after power has been turned on. These tests exercise the major components in the product, and are known as basic assurance tests (BATs). If a BAT failure occurs, the failing test is identified with a certain light pattern on the product's message indicator panel. The above method may be improved, particularly if a product has only 1 or 2 indicator lights. The method described here requires that the product have a minimum of one LED (light-emitting diode) indicator 10 (this light could even be the "power on" indicator) and that it be optically coupled to a "test result analyzer". This analyzer could be on the production line or a servicing tool for field repair used as shown in the figure. The processor 12 in the product serially encodes each test identification and its results after each test is run. This serialized data is used to drive the indicator light 10. A photodetector 14 is optically coupled to the indicator 10 and held in place with a suction cup 16 or similar attaching device. The detected serial data signal is fed to the test analyzer 18 where it is amplified, shaped and deserialized. The resulting codes are analyzed and if a BAT error has occurred, the failing test identification is displayed.

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