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Method of Plugging and Checking the Integrity of Highly Dense, Discretely Wired Computer Backpanels

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047710D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 15K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Casa, GE: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of locating the proper socket positions to plug a discrete wire into a backpanel, immediately verifies its proper locations, and checks the integrity of the wire just installed. When attempting to plug a highly dense panel with discrete wires, there are a number of problems that immediately present themselves as follows: 1. As the panel density increases, it becomes increasingly difficult to identify the sockets to be plugged. The point has been reached where nomenclature, that would be useable throughout the plugging process, is out of the question. 2. As the plugging of the backpanel progresses, it becomes more difficult to see the sockets to be plugged, even after they are located due to the inevitable wire build-up on the panel. 3.

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Method of Plugging and Checking the Integrity of Highly Dense, Discretely Wired Computer Backpanels

Disclosed is a method of locating the proper socket positions to plug a discrete wire into a backpanel, immediately verifies its proper locations, and checks the integrity of the wire just installed. When attempting to plug a highly dense panel with discrete wires, there are a number of problems that immediately present themselves as follows: 1. As the panel density increases, it becomes increasingly difficult to identify the sockets to be

plugged. The point has been reached where nomenclature,

that would be useable throughout the plugging process,

is out of the question. 2. As the plugging of the backpanel progresses, it becomes more difficult to see the sockets to be plugged, even after

they are located due to the inevitable wire build-up on the

panel. 3. The small size of the plugs, the extremely small

pitch of the sockets, along with the aforementioned wire

build-up makes TOTAL automation of the process extremely

difficult, and, therefore, a costly process on a relatively

low production machine. If the process of LOCATING the socket to be plugged could be automated, a human operator could be used to accomplish the delicate operation of plugging the wire. By placing light-emitting diode (LED) indicators in all the socket positions of the backpanel, it becomes possible to illuminate the LED in the "From" location and illuminate the LED in the "To" position. This indicates where both ends of a wire are to be plugged. The operator then removes the LED from the "From" socket and plugs in one end of the wire to be installed. Then the LED in the "To" socket can be removed, and the other end of the wire plugged into the vacated socket. The removed LEDs can be used in plugging the next panel. If one examines what has taken place in the above operation, it becomes apparent that at any given point in the operation there is only one socket on the entire panel that is empty. This is the socket to which the wire end is plugged. Given these circumstances, it should be virtually impossible to misplug a wire. When both ends of the wire are plugged, no further "prompting" for additional wire plugging would be done until the previously plugged wire was checked automatically for proper "From - To" position, shorts and opens.

After a successful test operation, prompting for the next wire would continue. Apparatus required to implement the method includes: Net list on disk - This is a list or definition of the wires to be placed on the panel. It contains the "From - To" information. In addition to the "From - To" information this record contains other information, such as wire type, wire length and any other information deemed necessary to give to the operator. Processor - This is a simple device that can read a disk, output to a display and printer, and be used to drive the decode/check controller. Display - The display is used to give prompting inf...