Browse Prior Art Database

Process for Initiating the Deposition of Magnesium and Other Low Melting-Point Metals Onto Polymeric Substrates

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047759D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cohen, MS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Magnesium and other low melting-point metals not only do not adhere well to many polymer surfaces, but they do not stick at all to some polymer surfaces. In the past, in order to deposit magnesium onto some polymers a binding layer, such as aluminum oxide, had to be deposited. It has now been discovered that by treating the polymer surface with a low intensity dose of low energy ions, magnesium can be made to stick to the polymer surface. Both oxygen and argon ions yield similar results. It is expected that this technique will work for other low melting-point materials that do not interact strongly with the polymer surface. The use of other energetic or strongly interacting beams, such as electron or photon beams, is an obvious extension.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 57% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Process for Initiating the Deposition of Magnesium and Other Low Melting- Point Metals Onto Polymeric Substrates

Magnesium and other low melting-point metals not only do not adhere well to many polymer surfaces, but they do not stick at all to some polymer surfaces. In the past, in order to deposit magnesium onto some polymers a binding layer, such as aluminum oxide, had to be deposited. It has now been discovered that by treating the polymer surface with a low intensity dose of low energy ions, magnesium can be made to stick to the polymer surface. Both oxygen and argon ions yield similar results. It is expected that this technique will work for other low melting-point materials that do not interact strongly with the polymer surface. The use of other energetic or strongly interacting beams, such as electron or photon beams, is an obvious extension. In a test run of the process four polymer samples (2 inch squares) and two glass monitor slides (1x3 inches) were coated by magnesium deposition, as described below. Two of the polymer samples and one monitor were shielded from the ion beam with a shutter. The other two polymer samples and the other monitor at the bottom of the photograph were bombarded with an 100 eV oxygen ion beam for 60 seconds. The ion current density for one bombarded polymer sample varied from .01 to .024 ma/cm2 . The ion current density for the other bombarded polymer sample varied from .010 to .002 ma/cm2 . The variation in the ion beam curre...