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Laser Plating and Melting for Hard Metal Surfaces

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047760D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gelchinski, MH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In this method, laser plating is followed by melting and quenching to produce hard metal surfaces, particularly of gold. Gold plating provides a standard coating used in the electronics industry to provide corrosion-free, high conducting surfaces particularly on connector parts. Laser-enhanced plating is one method by which gold can be deposited without the use of a mask. The generic process has been described previously. The laser technique has been used for local gold plating on nickel-coated, beryllium-copper foils used to form connector parts. This article describes a method for obtaining hard gold coatings using laser-enhanced, plating techniques that include a method for reflowing the deposited gold. Several laser processes can be employed to achieve this goal.

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Laser Plating and Melting for Hard Metal Surfaces

In this method, laser plating is followed by melting and quenching to produce hard metal surfaces, particularly of gold. Gold plating provides a standard coating used in the electronics industry to provide corrosion-free, high conducting surfaces particularly on connector parts. Laser-enhanced plating is one method by which gold can be deposited without the use of a mask. The generic process has been described previously. The laser technique has been used for local gold plating on nickel-coated, beryllium-copper foils used to form connector parts. This article describes a method for obtaining hard gold coatings using laser- enhanced, plating techniques that include a method for reflowing the deposited gold. Several laser processes can be employed to achieve this goal. In the simplest case, the laser dwell time can be adjusted so that some melting occurs during deposition. Alternatively, the laser-plated film can be deposited at a given laser power level; after plating, it can be exposed to a higher intensity, laser pulse to melt and quench the plated material. It is also possible to melt and freeze the deposited material using a separate laser either collinear with the plating laser or located remotely. Here, the melting and plating occur sequentially. A single pulse or a series of pulses produces melting and refreezing. We have observed excellent laser-plated gold deposits in which melting and refreezing occur. T...