Browse Prior Art Database

Handling of Jumper Wires in Automatic Cable Manufacture

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047762D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Meyer, JM: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method and an algorithm for generating a feasible path for an automated cable harness system is described. Cable harnesses may contain jumper leads, i.e., leads going from and to the same device. The design data for such a lead often specifies its end points, but not a path. For automatic manufacture of cable harnesses, the jumper leads must be positioned so that they are contained within the body of the cable, i.e., the jumper leads must be included in sections that are laced or tied. Our method generates a path from cable design data for the jumper lead that satisfies the following constraints: 1) The lacing is done no closer than a specified distance (call it JMIN) from fan-out points. 2) We try to avoid wasting too much wire.

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Handling of Jumper Wires in Automatic Cable Manufacture

A method and an algorithm for generating a feasible path for an automated cable harness system is described. Cable harnesses may contain jumper leads,
i.e., leads going from and to the same device. The design data for such a lead often specifies its end points, but not a path. For automatic manufacture of cable harnesses, the jumper leads must be positioned so that they are contained within the body of the cable, i.e., the jumper leads must be included in sections that are laced or tied. Our method generates a path from cable design data for the jumper lead that satisfies the following constraints: 1) The lacing is done no closer than a specified distance (call it JMIN) from fan-out points. 2) We try to avoid wasting too much wire. Specifically, we attempt to make the (new) links in the constructed path less than a value JMAX. This may not be possible, given the constraint that holder pins are placed in a grid of pre-drilled points. Referring to the drawing, the constructed path for the jumper will have five points: a point in the component fan-out corresponding to the "from" termination pin, the fan-out or vertex point, a turning point, the fan-out point again, and a point corresponding to the "to" termination pin. A jumper lead is defined as one having start and stop positions the same, as specified by the design data. A path for a jumper lead is created as follows: We identify jumper leads in the cable design data. Just prior to the fan-out construction step (in which the positions of the ends of leads going to a common component are modified to produce a fanned-out shape for winding and labeling), we find another l...