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Generalized Method of Quick Access to Record Through Record ID

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047787D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chang, PY: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a prior word processing record access method, the only fast access supported was when the user specified one and only one number in the record ID field of a qualify frame, as illustrated below: (Image Omitted) If a user wants a number of different records, such as 100 or 25 or 200, as illustrated below: (Image Omitted) or wants a range of records, such as the records greater than 200, or with other qualifiers, such as the records greater than 200 and the last name Jones, as illustrated below: (Image Omitted) a sequential access of each and every record was necessary. This can be a terrible waste of time since the user may only want to access 10 records out of up to 65,000 records. Reading 10 records may require only 2 seconds of time, while reading the whole file may take as long as an hour.

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Generalized Method of Quick Access to Record Through Record ID

In a prior word processing record access method, the only fast access supported was when the user specified one and only one number in the record ID field of a qualify frame, as illustrated below:

(Image Omitted)

If a user wants a number of different records, such as 100 or 25 or 200, as illustrated below:

(Image Omitted)

or wants a range of records, such as the records greater than 200, or with other qualifiers, such as the records greater than 200 and the last name Jones, as illustrated below:

(Image Omitted)

a sequential access of each and every record was necessary. This can be a terrible waste of time since the user may only want to access 10 records out of up to 65,000 records. Reading 10 records may require only 2 seconds of time, while reading the whole file may take as long as an hour. This problem was not addressed before because it was thought that a complicated algorithm was necessary to identify the situation, simplify the Boolean algebra formula, and access the records necessary. Most word processors have limited RAM (random-access memory) resource and cannot support such a complicated algorithm. The solution to the problem is a method of fast access for all conditions which involves the record ID field without needing a lot of memory space. The underlying idea of this solution is to use an internal counter to simulate the access of records on a diskette. If the simulated record ID does...