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Molded Ferrite Inductors and Transformers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047793D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cole, AS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Inductors and transformers can be mass-produced at low cost by forming conductors in desired helical or other configurations and embedding such formed conductors into a matrix of magnetically permeable plastic by injection molding or other molding procedures. A suitable magnetically permeable plastic is the material PBF (plastic bonded ferrite) produced commercially by Indiana General Corporation. Such material should have a low molding temperature which exceeds by a safe margin the hottest temperature at which or in which the inductor or transformer may be expected to operate. As shown in Fig. 1, the wire or conductor, which is to be formed into the desired inductor or transformer winding, is wound into a helical (or other) form in preparation for the molding operation.

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Molded Ferrite Inductors and Transformers

Inductors and transformers can be mass-produced at low cost by forming conductors in desired helical or other configurations and embedding such formed conductors into a matrix of magnetically permeable plastic by injection molding or other molding procedures. A suitable magnetically permeable plastic is the material PBF (plastic bonded ferrite) produced commercially by Indiana General Corporation. Such material should have a low molding temperature which exceeds by a safe margin the hottest temperature at which or in which the inductor or transformer may be expected to operate. As shown in Fig. 1, the wire or conductor, which is to be formed into the desired inductor or transformer winding, is wound into a helical (or other) form in preparation for the molding operation. A hollow plastic form may be used to sustain the conductor in the desired shape during this stage of the operation. If the shaped conductor requires additional shaping into, for instance, a torroidal configuration, it and the optional plastic form on which it is wound are appropriately bent (Fig. 2). The shaped conductor and its optional retaining form are then embedded, by injection molding or other molding procedures, in a matrix of PBF (Fig. 3). The process and its applications are not restricted to helically wound conductors or, for that matter, torroidal configurations (note the straight-wire single-turn inductor configuration of Fig. 4).

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