Browse Prior Art Database

Electronic Device Retainer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047805D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Nemier, SE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

High density packaging of discrete electronic devices, such as terminating resistors, has resulted in the requirement that in some cases these devices must be pluggable. Pluggability of discrete devices via connectors into printed circuit boards is advantageous from board test and field repair standpoints. This same pluggability, especially considering a plurality of devices, gives rise to problems concerning the retention of such devices in their respective connector sockets. This becomes especially critical under conditions of vibration and shock which might tend to cause the devices to work their way loose from their connectors, thereby causing electrical circuit malfunctions.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Electronic Device Retainer

High density packaging of discrete electronic devices, such as terminating resistors, has resulted in the requirement that in some cases these devices must be pluggable. Pluggability of discrete devices via connectors into printed circuit boards is advantageous from board test and field repair standpoints. This same pluggability, especially considering a plurality of devices, gives rise to problems concerning the retention of such devices in their respective connector sockets. This becomes especially critical under conditions of vibration and shock which might tend to cause the devices to work their way loose from their connectors, thereby causing electrical circuit malfunctions. The invention described herein provides a positive method of retaining discrete devices to PC boards as well as access of cooling air and device visibility. Fig. 1 shows three views of the device. As can be seen, it consists of a pair of side rails 1, which limit the side motion of the electrical devices and thereby protect them from damage. Spanning between the side rails are a series of beams 2. Each beam serves as a support for two cantilever retaining springs 3. Each cantilever spring provides the restraint for a row of terminating resistors 4. This symmetrical placement of the retaining springs has two advantages. First, the number of support beams 2 is reduced by one half, and, second, twisting stresses are virtually eliminated in the support beam reducin...