Browse Prior Art Database

Shock Gauge for Chip Carriers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047821D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arcus, AA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A need has developed to ascertain whether or not semiconductor integrated circuit chips on carriers have been exposed to severe handling during shipping. The shock gauge shown in the figure is a standard size chip of silicon 10, having no diffusions or personality, that has been partially sawed or scribed through to form a groove 12 therein. This scribe or groove 12 lowers the force necessary to fracture the silicon chip 10 so that the shock gauge will fracture before other silicon-chip-contained integrated circuits similarly mounted on a carrier will fracture. The force needed to fracture the shock gauge is inversely related to the depth of groove 12. Hence, the depth can be adjusted to yield a fracture at a force known to cause damage to silicon chips.

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Shock Gauge for Chip Carriers

A need has developed to ascertain whether or not semiconductor integrated circuit chips on carriers have been exposed to severe handling during shipping. The shock gauge shown in the figure is a standard size chip of silicon 10, having no diffusions or personality, that has been partially sawed or scribed through to form a groove 12 therein. This scribe or groove 12 lowers the force necessary to fracture the silicon chip 10 so that the shock gauge will fracture before other silicon-chip-contained integrated circuits similarly mounted on a carrier will fracture. The force needed to fracture the shock gauge is inversely related to the depth of groove 12. Hence, the depth can be adjusted to yield a fracture at a force known to cause damage to silicon chips. These chips are used to populate a carrier, and this carrier is shipped along with the carriers carrying integrated circuit silicon chip products. Upon receiving a shipment, the customer inspects these shock gauges and their condition is an indicator of severe handling during the shipment. An extension of this concept is to scribe chips to two different depths and color the chip with the deeper scribe yellow and the chip with the shallow scribe red. This color scheme would mean that if a yellow chip were broken, then the shipment may have some damage, but there is no immediate concern. If a red chip is broken, there is an immediate concern and the integrated circuit silicon should be...