Browse Prior Art Database

Single-Key Cursor Control

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047903D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Truelson, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Many CRT terminal display devices have some form of cursor or moving indicator to show the screen position at which data may next be entered. The cursor can be positioned by means of an off keyboard control device, such as a joy stick, a light pen, a mechanical mouse or the like, or by means of control keys located on the keyboard. The off keyboard devices require an operator to take hands away from the keyboard to move the cursor. This is a disadvantage to operating numerous devices, particularly those devices used when performing numerous functions, such as text editing and the like. When keys on the keyboard are used to move the cursor, they are frequently arranged in a block of four or five adjacent keys and the appropriate key, to move either left, right, up or down or diagonally up, left, down, right, etc.

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Single-Key Cursor Control

Many CRT terminal display devices have some form of cursor or moving indicator to show the screen position at which data may next be entered. The cursor can be positioned by means of an off keyboard control device, such as a joy stick, a light pen, a mechanical mouse or the like, or by means of control keys located on the keyboard. The off keyboard devices require an operator to take hands away from the keyboard to move the cursor. This is a disadvantage to operating numerous devices, particularly those devices used when performing numerous functions, such as text editing and the like. When keys on the keyboard are used to move the cursor, they are frequently arranged in a block of four or five adjacent keys and the appropriate key, to move either left, right, up or down or diagonally up, left, down, right, etc., must be located by the operator and used. An improved single-key control that operates four adjacent key positions on an existing keyboard is the subject of this disclosure. As shown in Fig. 1, a top view of a single large keytop 6 is shown. Underneath the keytop 6 are four adjacent normal key locations 2. The arrows 7 on the face of keytop 6 indicate the directions of motion that will result to the cursor if the keytop 6 is deflected either by rocking it toward the top, the left, the right, or diagonally toward a corner. In Fig. 1, if the upper left key position alone is actuated by rocking the key button 6 in the left upward diagonal direction, cursor move in the left upward diagonal direction will result. If key button 6 is rocked toward the left, and both key positions in the upper left and lower left corner of the configuration in Fig. 1 are actuated a direct leftward movement will result. If key 6 is pressed straight down so that all four key positions 2 are actuated, a home or recentering of the ...