Browse Prior Art Database

Removing Unwanted Data From the Communication Loop

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047918D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hayes, RL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a technique for eliminating unwanted data received by a limited cycle processor in a device such as a high speed printer attached to a word or data processing system. When unwanted data is transmitted to this device, the device must remove the data from the loop to avoid causing an error condition. This data must be removed without affecting the needed cycle processing time of other sub-systems. If a data frame is addressed to a device when the data frame is not supported by the device, the data frame is removed by storing unwanted data at a read-only storage (ROS) address space. When the interrupt level detects unwanted data, the direct memory access (DMA) is invoked to move the data to the ROS address space.

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Removing Unwanted Data From the Communication Loop

This article describes a technique for eliminating unwanted data received by a limited cycle processor in a device such as a high speed printer attached to a word or data processing system. When unwanted data is transmitted to this device, the device must remove the data from the loop to avoid causing an error condition. This data must be removed without affecting the needed cycle processing time of other sub-systems. If a data frame is addressed to a device when the data frame is not supported by the device, the data frame is removed by storing unwanted data at a read-only storage (ROS) address space. When the interrupt level detects unwanted data, the direct memory access (DMA) is invoked to move the data to the ROS address space. This action prevents the processor from reading each unwanted data byte and there after discarding the data, as well as avoiding unnecessary use of random-access memory (RAM) space.

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