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VIDEO Snapshot SYSTEM for Capturing Instantaneous VIDEO Pictures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047944D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 4 page(s) / 80K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rogers, GS: AUTHOR

Abstract

The objective of the system is to digitize the output from a video camera and store the information in a random-access memory (RAM). The contents of the RAM can either be displayed on a video monitor or passed to a computer data bank via a communications adapter under control of a terminal. In the computer, the digital information can be analyzed or manipulated, after which it can be written back into the RAM and displayed on the monitor. The system can be used to take a snapshot of Newton's rings generated by a magnetic head in contact with the surface of a magnetic disc rotating at 25 rps i.e., one revolution per 40 millisecs. The picture changes as the disc rotates so an endeavor must be made to keep the picture as true as possible. A light that illuminates the target is flashed for 100 microseconds, i.e.

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VIDEO Snapshot SYSTEM for Capturing Instantaneous VIDEO Pictures

The objective of the system is to digitize the output from a video camera and store the information in a random-access memory (RAM). The contents of the RAM can either be displayed on a video monitor or passed to a computer data bank via a communications adapter under control of a terminal. In the computer, the digital information can be analyzed or manipulated, after which it can be written back into the RAM and displayed on the monitor. The system can be used to take a snapshot of Newton's rings generated by a magnetic head in contact with the surface of a magnetic disc rotating at 25 rps i.e., one revolution per 40 millisecs. The picture changes as the disc rotates so an endeavor must be made to keep the picture as true as possible. A light that illuminates the target is flashed for 100 microseconds, i.e., approximately 1 degree of rotation. As soon as the light is actuated, digitizing of the picture commences and a FIELD or FRAME of digital information is recorded in the RAM. It takes some 40 milliseconds to capture a frame of the video camera output. The system has 4 modes of operation selectable by an operator: 1. SNAP The picture as seen by the camera is digitized and written into RAM. A practical design is to allow a video sample rate of 100 nanoseconds, i.e., 100 nanoseconds per pel (picture element). Each line will have 512 pels, and there will be 312.5 lines per field. With interlace, this gives 625 lines per frame. 2. DISPLAY The digitized information in the RAM is passed through a digital-to-analogue (D to A) converter and combined with a video synchronizing signal to produce a composite video input to the monitor. The picture will be displayed on the monitor as long as the system is in DISPLAY mode. 3. COMPUTE The contents of the RAM are written into computer storage, or the RAM is filled with data from computer storage. These operations are controlled by active engagement with a terminal. 4.TEST It is envisaged that this will comprise filling the RAM with data via a communication link and a terminal. This data will be such that when the system is put into DISPLAY mode, a pattern will be displayed on the monitor. This pattern will provide a visual check on the successful operation of most of the components used in the system. A data flow of the system is shown in the drawing. The system comprises 48 sixteen-pin modules of dynamic RAM 1, each module containing 64K by 1 bit wide data with automatic refreshing capability. Video control logic 2 is used to control the video camera 3 and video monitor 4. They comprise line and field synchronization signals. A communication adapter 5 allows the snapshot system to interface with a computer (not shown) via a communication bus 6. Data can be moved between the RAM 1 and the computer using a terminal to access the relevant communication control program. Clocks for the system are derived from a 20 Megahertz oscillat...