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Browse Prior Art Database

Delay of Keyboard Typamatic Mode

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000047989D
Original Publication Date: 1983-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chukran, RE: AUTHOR

Abstract

In some data processing applications, the operator has the opportunity to type ahead such that keystrokes are put into a keystroke queue. These keystrokes may reside in the queue for several seconds before the system reads them from the queue and displays them on the screen. Thus, many seconds may elapse before any keying error is visually detected by the operator. One common keying error is holding the key down too long, causing an unintentional entry of typamatic mode wherein multiple strokes of the same key are entered. The problem is how to prevent unintentional entry of typamatic mode and yet allow blind type-ahead keying. One solution discards the typamatic keystroke if the queue is not empty on the presumption that queuing typamatic keystrokes is never desirable.

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Delay of Keyboard Typamatic Mode

In some data processing applications, the operator has the opportunity to type ahead such that keystrokes are put into a keystroke queue. These keystrokes may reside in the queue for several seconds before the system reads them from the queue and displays them on the screen. Thus, many seconds may elapse before any keying error is visually detected by the operator. One common keying error is holding the key down too long, causing an unintentional entry of typamatic mode wherein multiple strokes of the same key are entered. The problem is how to prevent unintentional entry of typamatic mode and yet allow blind type-ahead keying. One solution discards the typamatic keystroke if the queue is not empty on the presumption that queuing typamatic keystrokes is never desirable. But, for an application where typamatic queuing is indeed desirable, a different solution is needed. As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the solution is to increase the apparent delay between the initial depression of a key and the subsequent generation of the first typamatic-mode keystroke. For some types of keyboard, this delay is programmable via a register. The present solution is for a keyboard in which this delay is fixed. With reference to Fig. 1, t1 is the delay time to enter the typamatic mode, and tx is the delay time between each subsequent typamatic character. The technique involves ignoring the first N-1 typamatic keystrokes which in effect lengthens the appare...