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Information Recording Through Void Stabilization

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048056D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chu, WH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Materials which undergo void stabilization for information recording must have the following characteristics: (1) be coated and processed in such a manner as to produce voids by solvent evaporation; (2) undergo a melt flow phase after solvent evaporation; and (3) be photosensitive in order to crosslink upon exposure and stabilize voids through an increase in viscosity or resistance to flow. The exposed areas containing the voids can then be filled with a dye to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and contrast for image reproduction, if needed.

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Information Recording Through Void Stabilization

Materials which undergo void stabilization for information recording must have the following characteristics: (1) be coated and processed in such a manner as to produce voids by solvent evaporation; (2) undergo a melt flow phase after solvent evaporation; and (3) be photosensitive in order to crosslink upon exposure and stabilize voids through an increase in viscosity or resistance to flow. The exposed areas containing the voids can then be filled with a dye to increase the signal-to-noise ratio and contrast for image reproduction, if needed.

For example, poly(m-diethynyl benzene) prepolymer was coated from tetrachloroethane, and baked to remove solvent. The film was exposed to UV light through a mask and then heated to 150 degree C (melt flow temperature of the material is about 135 degree C). When the film contains large voids as evidenced by the haziness of the unexposed film, a scattering pattern of the exposed region can be visually observed. By slower solvent evaporation, smaller voids are produced, thereby increasing the resolution. With smaller voids, no visible image is produced after exposure and heating. However, the exposed pattern can be "developed" by immersing the film in a SUDAN* blue-hexane solution. Trademark of General Aniline & Film Corporation.

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