Browse Prior Art Database

Spherical Magnetic Heads for Flexible Media

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048068D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Groom, JL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Flexible media produce a problem to magnetic heads in the head to medium interface to stabilize the wear rate and control the flying characteristics of the head with respect to the medium. Vents from the head to tape interface surface to atmosphere can be provided immediately adjacent to the magnetic gap to provide the desired flying height. Or a plurality of slots can be provided running parallel to the head to medium interface direction to stabilize the wear rate of the head.

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Spherical Magnetic Heads for Flexible Media

Flexible media produce a problem to magnetic heads in the head to medium interface to stabilize the wear rate and control the flying characteristics of the head with respect to the medium. Vents from the head to tape interface surface to atmosphere can be provided immediately adjacent to the magnetic gap to provide the desired flying height. Or a plurality of slots can be provided running parallel to the head to medium interface direction to stabilize the wear rate of the head.

If slots are not used in a spherical head, as shown in Fig. 1, the flexible medium to head interface distance is to great for good recording characteristics. If the slots are too wide, the medium can come in contact with the head, thereby providing an undesirable wear rate. An optimum slot width provides the correct pressure to give a desired spacing for an optimum recording interface. However, an optimum slot width at one altitude will not provide an optimum interface at a second altitude due to air density differences. The head in Fig. 1 comprises side shields 1 and 2 and a center section 3 that includes the transducing gap 4. Two vents 5 and 6 are provided adjacent to the transducer gap 4. The vents 5 and 6 are open at the medium interface and exit into the atmosphere. The vent to atmosphere characteristics of this head make it insensitive to density variations. The pitch variation from the inside to outside radius of the flexible medium shoul...