Browse Prior Art Database

Minimum Work Pinch Valve Button

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048095D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Halbeisen, RA: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

When A tube having a uniform circular cross-section is pinched shut between an anvil and button mechanism having flat surfaces, the squeezed cross-section has a bone-like shape. To the extent that the tube is not completely closed, fluid leakage can occur beyond the valve. To continue to pinch and eliminate these leaks requires tremendous additional force. To avoid the use of large forces and eliminate a requirement for tubes having special cross-section which can be used with known anvil and button arrangements, a button similar to that shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 above may be utilized.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 69% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Minimum Work Pinch Valve Button

When A tube having a uniform circular cross-section is pinched shut between an anvil and button mechanism having flat surfaces, the squeezed cross-section has a bone-like shape. To the extent that the tube is not completely closed, fluid leakage can occur beyond the valve. To continue to pinch and eliminate these leaks requires tremendous additional force. To avoid the use of large forces and eliminate a requirement for tubes having special cross-section which can be used with known anvil and button arrangements, a button similar to that shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3 above may be utilized.

Fig. 1 shows a perspective view of a pinch valve 1 which includes an anvil 2 having a wedge-like configuration, a button 3 having a centrally disposed depression 4 therein, and tubulation 5 interposed between anvil 2 and button 3. Fig. 2 is a cross sectional view of pinch valve 1 of fig. 1 in the open condition which clearly shows tubulation 5 having the circular cross-section of standard tubulation. Button 3 and anvil 2 are moved relative to each other by a screw and nut mechanism well known to those in the mechanical arts.

Fig. 3 shows a cross-sectional view of pinch valve 1 in the closed condition. It should be noted that the circular cross-section has collapsed to a cross-section which is more like a line in cross-section rather than the bone-like configuration referred to hereinabove. The pinch mechanism shown requires minimum work in that most...