Browse Prior Art Database

Gas Ionization Breakdown Voltage Calibration Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048170D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chamberlin, JB: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This is a quick, easy way of calibrating a ramp tester used for (in-line) breakdown measurements. A visible display of actual breakdown is obtained.

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Gas Ionization Breakdown Voltage Calibration Device

This is a quick, easy way of calibrating a ramp tester used for (in-line) breakdown measurements. A visible display of actual breakdown is obtained.

The proposal makes use of a gas ionization bulb 1 attached to a circular copper clad disc 2 on a wafer chuck 3, as shown in Fig. 1.

One of the bulb leads contacts the top copper clad plate 4, and the other the bottom plate 5. When a sufficient voltage is applied on the copper clad plates across insulator 6, ionization occurs in bulb 1, causing current to be conducted and the bulb to glow. The voltage that causes this ionization (and hence conduction from one copper plate to the other) is a reproducible characteristic of the type of gas in bulb 1. The current voltage characteristics of the gas ionization calibration device is indicated in Fig. 2, with neon chosen as the gas.

This proposal can be used to calibrate test equipment which measures dielectric or junction breakdowns. By choosing the right gas, the current voltage characteristics of a particular test could be matched. Fig. 3 illustrates schematically the use of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) structures for measuring the dielectric integrity of, for example, gate oxides. By ramping the voltage across MOS structures and measuring the voltage at the onset of conduction, a measure of the number of oxide defects is obtained. Typical I-V plots for MOS structures are similar to the one shown in Fig. 2.

Calibration...