Browse Prior Art Database

X-Ray Lithography Enhancements/ Extension

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048175D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Callimari, RJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

X-ray lithography in today's level of technology is primarily restricted to single level fabrication due to lack of alignment (layer to layer) capability. Further, the general practice is to fabricate separate masks by conventional photolithography and electroplating procedures on films, such as MYLAR*, etc., which are then frame assembled. These masks have inherent shortcomings, such as instability (dimensional), and are fragile. X-ray exposures are desirable in that they offer the capability of exposing relatively thick films on dense grids and achieve developed patterns having superior pattern profiles, i.e., near vertical pattern (top to bottom) of developed images.

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X-Ray Lithography Enhancements/ Extension

X-ray lithography in today's level of technology is primarily restricted to single level fabrication due to lack of alignment (layer to layer) capability. Further, the general practice is to fabricate separate masks by conventional photolithography and electroplating procedures on films, such as MYLAR*, etc., which are then frame assembled. These masks have inherent shortcomings, such as instability (dimensional), and are fragile. X-ray exposures are desirable in that they offer the capability of exposing relatively thick films on dense grids and achieve developed patterns having superior pattern profiles, i.e., near vertical pattern (top to bottom) of developed images. The following description relates to a method where separate masks are not required, and E-beam writing is utilized with alignment capability and extends E-beam exposure to thick films.

Process steps:

1. Evaporate seed layer (Cr-Cu) go substrate (e.g.,

multilayer ceramic) surface 200-400 A.

2. Apply HC resist to required thickness using multiple

spin cycles, if necessary, i.e., 5 microns and 12 microns.

Precoat with silane adhesion promoter.

3. Laminate with moderate adhesion a metallized MYLAR

film to the resist surface - metal side up.

4. Coat negative resist to approximately 1 micron thickness.

5. E-beam or optical exposure of personality, and

develop.

6. Electroplate custom mask background with approximately

1 micron of gold - acid or neutral pH.

7. Ex...