Browse Prior Art Database

Production Pallet Power Supply Bus Bar

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048234D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bennett, WC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In the assembly of computer terminal devices, the terminals are assembled on pallets affixed or driven by conveyor systems for movement from one work station to the next. When the terminal assembly operations have been completed, it is necessary to supply power to the terminal to test its operation. This is normally conducted by a hand operation of plugging the terminal into an appropriate power supply and allowing it to "burn in" for the detection of early-life failures.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 81% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Production Pallet Power Supply Bus Bar

In the assembly of computer terminal devices, the terminals are assembled on pallets affixed or driven by conveyor systems for movement from one work station to the next. When the terminal assembly operations have been completed, it is necessary to supply power to the terminal to test its operation. This is normally conducted by a hand operation of plugging the terminal into an appropriate power supply and allowing it to "burn in" for the detection of early-life failures.

Figs. 1A, 1B and Fig. 2 illustrate the operative elements of a bus bar system for supplying power adjacent to a conveyor (not shown) where an appropriate set of contactors (not shown) attach to a moving pallet can contact the bus bar to supply power to the pallet and, via connections on the pallet, to the computer terminal for automatically supplying power to the terminal, as needed. Fig. 1A is a plan view of a typical bus bar section comprising a basic extruded or molded insulator block 1 with conductors 2, 3 and 4 positioned in the bottom of slots, which are better seen in Fig. 2.

Fig. 1B illustrates a horizontal elevation showing the position of the conductors 2 through 4 that lie within the body of the molded insulator 1. The conductor bars may be of high lead content brass or any other suitable conductive material, and the insulator block 1 may be any of numerous injection molded plastics.

Spring conductor contacts mounted on the pallet (not shown) con...