Browse Prior Art Database

Keyboard Part Formatting Machine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048235D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Murray, FL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the assembly of multiple-key keyboards, it is often required to provide a unique array of key-button assemblies. This is typically done by an XY pickup and placement device or by manual placement of parts in an appropriate layout. Supplies of small parts, such as keybuttons or key switch housings, are typically provided in bulk. Normally existing laboratory feeders which orient the parts into similar orientation are well known in the industry. The present disclosure utilizes the output of such feeding devices (not shown) and employs a movable carrier to receive the fed parts and arrange them in the proper array to suit a given format.

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Keyboard Part Formatting Machine

In the assembly of multiple-key keyboards, it is often required to provide a unique array of key-button assemblies. This is typically done by an XY pickup and placement device or by manual placement of parts in an appropriate layout. Supplies of small parts, such as keybuttons or key switch housings, are typically provided in bulk. Normally existing laboratory feeders which orient the parts into similar orientation are well known in the industry. The present disclosure utilizes the output of such feeding devices (not shown) and employs a movable carrier to receive the fed parts and arrange them in the proper array to suit a given format.

Fig. 1A illustrates a typical plan view of the top surface of a formatting carrier intended for accepting key buttons or key switch housings and putting them into an appropriate positional relationship relative to one another, as illustrated schematically by the oblong lugs on the carrier mat 2.

Fig. 1B illustrates a horizontal elevation looking at the edge of the carrier 2 in Fig. 1A. The lugs 1 are seen to be integrally molded otherwise affixed projections of the rubber belt material making up the carrier 2.

Fig. 1C illustrates how the carrier 2 and lugs 1 can be used to automatically orient and format parts, such as keybutton housings, typically illustrated as element 5 in Fig. 1C. The housings 5 are fed by means of a feeder and orienting device (not shown) to the area 3 adjacent to track 4 which forms a plu...