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Browse Prior Art Database

Device for In-Situ Testing of Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048266D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 110K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Purushothaman, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Tensile testing of materials, such as mercury, that freeze at low temperature usually requires casting of the material in a mold, transferring the cast specimen onto precooled test fixtures through a moisture-free environment, followed by cooling to the desired test temperatures and then testing. The device shown in the figure accomplishes the entire procedure in a single cycle comprising room temperature assembly, cooling to the desired cryogenic temperatures, and testing at those temperatures.

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Device for In-Situ Testing of Materials

Tensile testing of materials, such as mercury, that freeze at low temperature usually requires casting of the material in a mold, transferring the cast specimen onto precooled test fixtures through a moisture-free environment, followed by cooling to the desired test temperatures and then testing. The device shown in the figure accomplishes the entire procedure in a single cycle comprising room temperature assembly, cooling to the desired cryogenic temperatures, and testing at those temperatures.

A cross-sectional view of the device is shown in Fig. 1A, the actual shape of the device being a solid of revolution around the center line. In the core of the device is a mold 5 having a specimen shaped interior cavity, which has been split into four segments that fit back together within close tolerance. The exterior shape of split mold 5 is such that it will open up into its four segments unless constrained from doing so. This ease of movement is due to the narrow base and top heavy upper section of the mold, while the constraint is provided by the upper and lower grip sections 3 and 7, respectively, which straddle the split mold and are held together with a weak spring retention mechanism 4.

In an actual test, the inside of the device is filled with the liquid to be tested and the device is fixed onto a mechanical test frame at room temperature. The whole assembly is then cooled to the freezing point of the test liquid and then...