Browse Prior Art Database

Magnetic Technique for Converting Rotational Motion Into Linear Motion

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048273D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Rachui, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

A structure is provided for converting rotational motion into linear motion through rotating magnets which alternately retract and repel reciprocating magnets to produce oscillating linear motion. With reference to the figure, the present mechanical actuator uses permanent magnets to translate rotary motion to linear motion without contact between rotating and reciprocating members. The rotating member consists of two magnetically opposed rings. The reciprocating member, mounted in a space between the magnetic rings, consists of a U-shaped structure 12 holding two bar magnets 13. As the magnetic rings 11 rotate, they alternately attract and repel the bar magnets 13, causing them to move back and forth. One revolution constitutes a single stroke.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Magnetic Technique for Converting Rotational Motion Into Linear Motion

A structure is provided for converting rotational motion into linear motion through rotating magnets which alternately retract and repel reciprocating magnets to produce oscillating linear motion.

With reference to the figure, the present mechanical actuator uses permanent magnets to translate rotary motion to linear motion without contact between rotating and reciprocating members. The rotating member consists of two magnetically opposed rings. The reciprocating member, mounted in a space between the magnetic rings, consists of a U-shaped structure 12 holding two bar magnets 13. As the magnetic rings 11 rotate, they alternately attract and repel the bar magnets 13, causing them to move back and forth. One revolution constitutes a single stroke.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 3 pictures or other non-text objects]