Browse Prior Art Database

Feeder Bank

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048295D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 3 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lonser, DE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A feeder bank is described that has utility in an automatic component insertion machine used for populating printed circuit cards. The feeder bank is used in conjunction with various feeders such as s module feeder, a single inline package (SIP) feeder, and a dual inline package (DIP) feeder.

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Feeder Bank

A feeder bank is described that has utility in an automatic component insertion machine used for populating printed circuit cards. The feeder bank is used in conjunction with various feeders such as s module feeder, a single inline package (SIP) feeder, and a dual inline package (DIP) feeder.

The feeder bank includes a series of precise locating positions to hold the feeders. The apparatus has provision for locating many module feeders in a very small area with no moving parts. It has precision interchangeable locations for a variety of module feeders.

The feeder bank 1 (Fig. 1) holds the feeders at an inclined angle. It is designed so that the back face of the leading components of the three types of feeders fall in the same plane when the feeders are inserted in the feeder bank locations. By achieving this, a gripper, such as a robotic gripper, for example, goes to the same point over the feeder to retrieve a part independently of the type of part. See gripper 2-4 in Fig. 2.

The locations in the feeder bank have identical dimensions. The three types of feeders also have identical overall dimensions. Therefore, the locations accommodate the three types of feeders interchangeably. This is advantageous since the part supply can then be matched to any job being run on a particular day on the component-insertion machine.

Modules are packaged electronic components that come in several different sizes. A common one is approximately one-inch square and .312" high. Modules cone from the manufacturer packaged in standard container tubes. The module feeder 5, shown in Fig. 3, dispenses modules automatically, is simple to fabricate, does not require an actuator, and contains no moving parts. The container tube 6 is inserted in the feeder and is held against element 7 by the action of a friction pad on the underneath surface of panel 8. By holding the feeder at an inclined angle, the leading module 9 slides onto ribs inside element 7 and is stopped in position by stop 10. From this position, a module can be removed by a robotic gripper which pinches the module on the sides and lifts it normal to the inclined plane. Succeeding modules are handled in a similar f...