Browse Prior Art Database

Poly (1, 3, 5 Triethynylbenzene) Diacetylene Polymer as an MCP Dielectric

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048325D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Economy, J: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Poly (1, 3, 5 triethtnylbenzene) diacetylene, hereinafter referred to as TEB, is applied in at least one layer on a ceramic or quartz substrate and cured to form a dielectric in an MCP (metallized ceramic polyimide) product for the mounting of silicon chips. In this configuration, a ceramic substrate is provided with a conductive network on its top surface. The dielectric material is disposed over this conductive network, and a second conductive network is disposed on the top of the dielectric material, normally connected to the first conductive network through etched metal-filled vias. A silicon semiconductor chip is mounted on the second conductive network.

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Poly (1, 3, 5 Triethynylbenzene) Diacetylene Polymer as an MCP Dielectric

Poly (1, 3, 5 triethtnylbenzene) diacetylene, hereinafter referred to as TEB, is applied in at least one layer on a ceramic or quartz substrate and cured to form a dielectric in an MCP (metallized ceramic polyimide) product for the mounting of silicon chips. In this configuration, a ceramic substrate is provided with a conductive network on its top surface. The dielectric material is disposed over this conductive network, and a second conductive network is disposed on the top of the dielectric material, normally connected to the first conductive network through etched metal-filled vias. A silicon semiconductor chip is mounted on the second conductive network.

In the past this dielectric material has included plastics, such as polyimide. However, under certain conditions polyimide has exhibited some size instability, e.g., in the presence of water vapor. Also, polyimide tends to be conformal, i.e., conforming to the under surface layer, rather than planar, i.e., forming a flat top surface.

TEB, when used, is essentially hydrophobic, and impervious to water vapor; it is thermally stable and will not decompose at temperatures up to 400 degrees C. TEB shows excellent wetability of ceramic and quartz surfaces, forms a planar, void-free film, and can be etched by conventional techniques. The preferred TEB has an average molecular weight of from about 200 to about 10,000, and the prepolymer has th...