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Browse Prior Art Database

Controlled Rate Wetting/ Coating Mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048336D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pawletko, JP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

It is often necessary to coat a particular material with a layer of fluid or powder. In the printing arts, particularly in electrolytic printing, it is often desirable to wet the printing medium at a controlled rate for a wide range of papers and over different paper speeds. The following arrangement has been found to be particularly useful and accurate in metering the rate of moisture deposition in an electrolytic printer.

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Controlled Rate Wetting/ Coating Mechanism

It is often necessary to coat a particular material with a layer of fluid or powder. In the printing arts, particularly in electrolytic printing, it is often desirable to wet the printing medium at a controlled rate for a wide range of papers and over different paper speeds. The following arrangement has been found to be particularly useful and accurate in metering the rate of moisture deposition in an electrolytic printer.

The drawings illustrate several views of a serial wetting mechanism. Roller 12 is mounted on a cantilevered assembly 14 which assures that no contact between rollers 12 and 16 occurs during an idle period. When coating or wetting, the entire mechanism 10 is moved toward the paper, in the direction shown by the arrow 18, thereby deflecting the spring loaded roller assembly 14 toward the roller 16. The degree of pressure exerted against roller 16 by the spring biased roller 12 is determined by the position of the adjusting screw 20. The spacing between and the surface properties of the rollers 12 and 16 determine the specific liquid deposition rate or the range of the rates.

Roller 16 is wetted by a wick 22 of predetermined porosity which is positioned to be in light contact therewith. A small space therebetween, however, may be provided for a capillary layer to occur. The wick 22 is supplied with fluid from a reservoir 24, as is depicted in the drawings.

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