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Sensing Temperature and Loss of Cooling Fluid in Multi-Chip Module

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048421D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chu, RC: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In a multi-chip helium-cooled circuit module, one chip has a heater resistor to simulate the power input to operating chips, and it has two temperature sensing diodes. A metal heat-conducting stud is shaped to make normal contact with a first of the two diodes but be slightly spaced away from the second diode. Thus, the first diode simulates the temperature of a chip that receives normal cooling partly by conduction through the metal stud and partly by heat transfer through the helium. The second diode simulates a chip that is cooled only by the helium. If cooling water fails, both diodes signal similar temperature increases. If helium has leaked from the module sufficiently to interfere with cooling, only the second diode will signal a temperature increase.

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Sensing Temperature and Loss of Cooling Fluid in Multi-Chip Module

In a multi-chip helium-cooled circuit module, one chip has a heater resistor to simulate the power input to operating chips, and it has two temperature sensing diodes. A metal heat-conducting stud is shaped to make normal contact with a first of the two diodes but be slightly spaced away from the second diode. Thus, the first diode simulates the temperature of a chip that receives normal cooling partly by conduction through the metal stud and partly by heat transfer through the helium. The second diode simulates a chip that is cooled only by the helium. If cooling water fails, both diodes signal similar temperature increases. If helium has leaked from the module sufficiently to interfere with cooling, only the second diode will signal a temperature increase.

Some multi-chip modules have a heat sink, such as a plate, that is cooled by chilled water. Heat is transferred from the chip to the heat sink partly by metal studs that directly contact the accessible face of each chip. In addition, the module is filled with a heat transfer fluid, such as helium, that also carries heat from the chips to the heat sink. Possible failure mechanisms are (1) interruption of chilled water to the heat sink and (2) leakage of the fluid from the module. It is desirable to identify any abnormal increase in chip temperature and to identify the failure mechanism.

The drawing represents a chip 3 that is mounted on a chip...