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Measuring Device For Head And Tape Contact

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048460D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

George, OE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The principles of interferometry can be used to measure the contact are between a head and a magnetic tape. The head is made of a transparent material with the same shape as the magnetic head of interest. A light source illuminates the interface between the tape and the head, and the contact is viewed by a microscope to see the interference patterns.

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Measuring Device For Head And Tape Contact

The principles of interferometry can be used to measure the contact are between a head and a magnetic tape. The head is made of a transparent material with the same shape as the magnetic head of interest. A light source illuminates the interface between the tape and the head, and the contact is viewed by a microscope to see the interference patterns.

The measurement of the degree of separation between a head and a magnetic tape due to the defects in the topography of the magnetic tape can be viewed using the principles of interferometry. A transparent head made of glass, for instance, includes a flat back side to permit viewing through the head to the head surface. The magnetic tape is suspended by supports such that the magnetic tape contacts the head in a manner similar to that in a tape drive. The magnetic tape is placed under tension by weights, for instance, as it contacts the head. A microscope with a vertical illuminator as a light source is placed to view the head and tape interface through the flat side of the transparent head. The light source illuminates the interface and produces an interference pattern that can be viewed through the microscope. A mechanism provides relative motion between the microscope and the tape such that the full width of the tape, as it contacts the head, can be viewed.

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