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Micromanipulator For In-Situ SEM Experiments

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048467D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Aliotta, CF: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A micromanipulator probe is described which may be used to apply or sense voltages and/or currents over a very small device area during inspection with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for electrical testing or as a research tool for measuring grain growth, hillock growth or diffusivity.

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Micromanipulator For In-Situ SEM Experiments

A micromanipulator probe is described which may be used to apply or sense voltages and/or currents over a very small device area during inspection with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) for electrical testing or as a research tool for measuring grain growth, hillock growth or diffusivity.

X and Y linear controls 10 and 12, respectively, move the fulcrum 14 of probe arm 16 in each direction. The linear controls are controlled externally to the SEM sample chamber by rods which may be rotated. Vacuum integrity is maintained by O-rings. Z direction motion (up and down) is accomplished by attracting a ferrous slug 18, attached to the remote end of arm 20, with a magnetic field generated by coil 22. Once the probe tip 24 is lifted away from the surface of sample 26 by the action of coil 22, the X,Y controls 10, 12 may be used to move the probe tip 24 over the surface to a selected spot. When the magnetic field generated by coil 22 is removed, the probe tip descends on the selected spot.

The micromanipulator body comprises a stage 28 which may be moved in the X,Y direction by linear controls 30, 32 in such a way that the entire sample may be scanned by the electron beam without moving the probe tip with respect to the sample surface. The probe tip may be formed from tungsten wire, for example, which has a pointed end at the tip. The tip end may also be coated with gold, for example, for better conductivity.

The probe and t...