Browse Prior Art Database

Verification of High Speed Data Sources Through Manipulation of the Data Rate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048492D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ko, MA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of verifying the operation of a data source which produces data faster than available data collection techniques. This is accomplished by providing a means of transferring control of the clock which determines the data rate from the data source to a unit from which verification can be made.

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Verification of High Speed Data Sources Through Manipulation of the Data Rate

Disclosed is a method of verifying the operation of a data source which produces data faster than available data collection techniques. This is accomplished by providing a means of transferring control of the clock which determines the data rate from the data source to a unit from which verification can be made.

For example, the ability to isolate display failures at a display/ adapter connection is required for a customer replaceable display unit in a keyboard/display system. The four interface lines connecting the adapter and the display are the vertical sync (1), the horizontal sync (2), the bright (3), and the video lines (4). In word processing display units, the four signals on these lines are available to software via the diagnostic data bus drivers (A), as illustrated in Fig. 1. sync signals requires that the period and pulse width be within the limitation of the display to be driven. Verification of the proper operation of the bright and video signals, on the other hand, requires a relation of the presence or the absence of the signal to the data to be displayed.

Generally, the vertical sync is slow enough that it can be measured by software even though measurement of the horizontal sync might pose problems. Measurement of both the video and the bright signals, however, is impossible without additional hardware. An earlier article (*) discloses a method in which the video signal sets a latch if it ever makes a transition. While this met...