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Browse Prior Art Database

Multiple Search Arguments for Global Replace/ Delete

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048511D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Herzik, AM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of handling case changes in non-English languages for global replace/delete operations through presenting three search/ replace string arguments for choice instead of just one.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 74% of the total text.

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Multiple Search Arguments for Global Replace/ Delete

Disclosed is a method of handling case changes in non-English languages for global replace/delete operations through presenting three search/ replace string arguments for choice instead of just one.

During normal usage of a word processing display terminal, the global replace/delete function allows an operator to specify one string of 1-60 characters to be either deleted (in all following occurrences) or replaced (in all following occurrences) by another string of 1-60 characters.

One of the uses of this function is to replace a given word with a word that is consistent in case (i.e., all lower case, all upper case, initial caps). No special problems occur when this change is desired in the English language. In non-English languages, however, special rules often apply which present a problem. For example: In National French, etage becomes Etage in initial caps.

In Canadian French, etage becomes Etage in initial caps.

In German, the "scharfes-s" (Beta) occurs only in lower case

words and becomes "SS" in upper case.

Since a word processor may support many different keyboards with different languages, it is not always possible to determine from the keyboard the language of the text.

The disclosed solution to this problem is to provide the word processor operator with three search/replace strings, thereby enabling the operator to specify how the occurrences of lower case, upper case and initial caps are to be repla...