Browse Prior Art Database

Conditionally Protected Screen Locations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048514D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-08
Document File: 2 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

McCaskill, RA: AUTHOR

Abstract

In operator interactive display systems, a cursor is generally provided to facilitate the positioning of keyable data. Cursor motion is normally accomplished one character position at a time. However, there are occasions when the cursor must be moved through a protected (i.e., non-keyable) location. As a specific example, in the Record Selection Frame, the screen positions between the end of data in one column and the beginning of data in the next column are considered protected in the sense that data cannot be entered or edited in those positions. The poisitions in the second row of data between the(see article) after character C and the character D are protected.

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Conditionally Protected Screen Locations

In operator interactive display systems, a cursor is generally provided to facilitate the positioning of keyable data. Cursor motion is normally accomplished one character position at a time. However, there are occasions when the cursor must be moved through a protected (i.e., non-keyable) location. As a specific example, in the Record Selection Frame, the screen positions between the end of data in one column and the beginning of data in the next column are considered protected in the sense that data cannot be entered or edited in those positions. The poisitions in the second row of data between the(see article) after character C and the character D are protected.

According to the disclosed procedure, the cursor moves through protected locations in some cases and skips protected locations in other cases. Specifically, when right/left cursor motion is done, the protected locations are skipped. Thus, if the cursor is on the D, the cursor left moves the cursor to the (See Article) after the C.

Cursor motion up/down does not, however, skip this protected area. If the cursor is on the 6, then cursor down positions the cursor in the second row under the 6, instead of skipping to the X. From this position, cursor right moves the cursor to D, and cursor left moves the cursor to the (See Article) after the C. This definition allows easy positioning between data in columns using cursor right/left and avoids accidentally skipping ro...