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Preparation of Conducting Polypyrrole Films By Electrochemical Oxidation Polymerization of Pyrrole In The Absence of Water And Oxygen

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048657D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clarke, TC: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A technique for the preparation of conducting films of a pyrrole based polymer in the absence of oxygen and water involves the use of an electrolyte salt, the carbon of which is conveniently reduced to the metal using the cell potential required to electrochemically polymerize pyrrole. Thus, the electrolyte cation provides the counter reaction at the cathode to the electrochemical oxidation at the anode. This cathode reaction is attractive because the products, i.e., the metal, plate out on the cathode and do not contaminate the cell.

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Preparation of Conducting Polypyrrole Films By Electrochemical Oxidation Polymerization of Pyrrole In The Absence of Water And Oxygen

A technique for the preparation of conducting films of a pyrrole based polymer in the absence of oxygen and water involves the use of an electrolyte salt, the carbon of which is conveniently reduced to the metal using the cell potential required to electrochemically polymerize pyrrole. Thus, the electrolyte cation provides the counter reaction at the cathode to the electrochemical oxidation at the anode. This cathode reaction is attractive because the products,
i.e., the metal, plate out on the cathode and do not contaminate the cell.

A specific example of this system would involve an electrolytic cell consisting of 0.1 M silver perchlorate (or other appropriate salt) and 0.06 M pyrrole in an oxygen-free acetonitrile solution. The anode can be platinum or any other metal electrochemically inert under these conditions, and the anode is a corresponding inert metal, e.g., platinum, gold or silver. With 0.5 V across the cell, a film of pyrrole, dark bronze in color, forms on the anode and silver metal plates out at the cathode. Under these conditions a film 10 microns thick forms in 3 hours. Faster rates of film formation can be achieved by increasing the voltage across the cell. The electrical conductivity of these waterfree films is approximately 50 ohm/-1/ per cm. The films are smooth and adhere well to the substrate.

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