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Electroplating With Conducting Organic Charge Transfer Salts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048664D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Engler, EM: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Certain highly conducting organic charge-transfer salts are useful as templates for high resolution electroplating. Previously it had been known that organic conductors based on tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) halide derivatives could function as either positive or negative high resolution resists in E-beam lithography. The present invention teaches a new application of these materials that combines these lithographic properties with their high conductivity to permit the fabrication of metal microstructures. Such high resolution metal patterns have found widespread applications in electronic circuits, displays and printing technologies.

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Electroplating With Conducting Organic Charge Transfer Salts

Certain highly conducting organic charge-transfer salts are useful as templates for high resolution electroplating. Previously it had been known that organic conductors based on tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) halide derivatives could function as either positive or negative high resolution resists in E-beam lithography. The present invention teaches a new application of these materials that combines these lithographic properties with their high conductivity to permit the fabrication of metal microstructures. Such high resolution metal patterns have found widespread applications in electronic circuits, displays and printing technologies.

The chemical process that underlies the use of TTF-halide films in E-beam lithography is schematically illustrated in Equation (1) below. Exposure of the film to an E-beam of sufficient current density leads to a reverse electron transfer reaction to generate the neutral constituents. Loss of halogen from the film causes a differential solubility and vapor pressure between exposed and unexposed regions of the film. Depending upon the exposure conditions, either a negative or positive image can be developed with a resolution on the order of 1 micron. (see original).

Under low current-density exposure conditions (dose: approximately 10/-5/ coul/ sq cm, irradiated areas undergo cross-linking and become insulating. Polar solvent washing can remove the unexposed areas, and leads to...