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Block Operations For Text Revision

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048715D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 5 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Adam, TL: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Revisions to text involve four types of operations: Insertion of new text, Deletion of existing text, Moving existing text, and Copying existing text.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 29% of the total text.

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Block Operations For Text Revision

Revisions to text involve four types of operations:

Insertion of new text, Deletion of existing text, Moving existing text, and Copying existing text.

The block operations described herein provide an easy to learn and use method of deleting, moving and copying existing text by the use of leading prompts and display highlighting. Block operations are invoked by one of the following keys:

Delete, Move, and Copy.

The block operations all require that a block be defined prior to the start of the operation. The operator "blocks" the desired text via the cursor motion keys. All characters from the block beginning up to and including the cursor position are video-reversed to emphasize that they are part of the block.

During a block operation (i.e., from the invocation of a block operation until the completion of a block operation), only the block being defined by the operator is video-reversed. Other fields within the Text Viewport that would otherwise be video-reversed (e.g., words marked by Spelling check) are displayed without video-reverse unless included within the block being defined by the operator.

The block may span any of the logical boundaries (e.g., such as a page end), but it must be contiguous. The operator may define the block by moving the cursor forward or backward. The block operations are completed by depressing the Enter key after the operator answers the last prompt. The operator may cancel any block operation via the Cancel key. Depressing the Cancel key de- highlights the "blocked" text, clears the prompt on the Prompt Line, and leaves the cursor at its present position.

The Block Delete function is operational only during the Create/ Revise Document tasks and is initiated by depressing the Delete key. When Block Delete is initiated, the message "Delete Text" appears in the Context field of the First Status Line and the cursored character is video reversed. At the same time, the following prompt appears on the Prompt Line: Delete What?

If the operator only wants to delete one character, then the operator may depress the Enter key with moving the cursor. This is due to the fact that the cursored character is initially video-reversed.

If the operator wants to delete more than one character, then the operator must use the cursor keys to define the block. The operator may define the block in either a forward or backward direction. If the operator wants to define the block in the backward direction, then moving the cursor backward may be accomplished via the following keys: Cursor Left, Cursor Up, Boundary Left, Boundary Up, and Go To.

To illustrate how the operator defines a block going backwards consider the following example. The operator keyed the text shown below:

1

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the the purpose of this bill is(-)

The operator accidentally typed the word "the" twice and wants to move the cursor back and delete one of the words, "the": the the purpose of this bill is

To delete the cu...