Browse Prior Art Database

Photoconductor Defect Detection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048723D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Adley, JM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Photoconductor material is nondestructively tested prior to installation by coating its entire surface with toner and then sensing any light transmitted through the photoconductor by a high intensity lamp.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 98% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Photoconductor Defect Detection

Photoconductor material is nondestructively tested prior to installation by coating its entire surface with toner and then sensing any light transmitted through the photoconductor by a high intensity lamp.

Photoconductor testing usually requires destructive analysis of select samples. This destroys the photoconductor portion that passes the test and fails to test the rest.

Production-type spools of photoconductors are fixtured to supply photoconductors to a charge corona A located at least 12 inches in front of a multi-roll developer B to produce a uniform layer of toner. The photoconductor is thus developed as an all black surface, except where photoconductive defects have reduced the charge level to produce defects in the developed layer. The photoconductor surface is then illuminated with a light source from either the back side or front side of the photoconductor. A detector system placed on the opposite side detects "holes" in the developed toner layer corresponding to photoconductor defects. Standard image analysis techniques can be used to count the defects and grade them by size and frequency. The toner is then cleaned off the photoconductor by a multi-staged cleaner C, and returned to the developer.

Accurate defect counts on 100 percent of the photoconductor produced can be made on a continuous basis, allowing early rejection of unacceptable lots and accurate monitoring of line performance.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page conta...