Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Dispersion Analysis

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048732D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Britton, RS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A Hegman gage (product of the Precision Gage and Tool Company) and darkfield photography provide accurate measurement of the grind number of a solution containing a dispersion of solid particles, for example, a magnetic ink, an RTV dispersion of particulate matter, or dust particles which have been gathered from an airstream.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 97% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Dispersion Analysis

A Hegman gage (product of the Precision Gage and Tool Company) and darkfield photography provide accurate measurement of the grind number of a solution containing a dispersion of solid particles, for example, a magnetic ink, an RTV dispersion of particulate matter, or dust particles which have been gathered from an airstream.

The Hegman gage is a steel block having two channels which are inclined to an accurately-flat horizontal surface. The depth of these channels linearly varies over a 5-centimeter length, from 0 to 5 millimeter. The horizontal surface is marked adjacent each channel,in order to indicate the varying depth of the channel.

A quantity of the solution to be tested is placed on the gage, covering the deep part of these channels (Fig. 1). An accurately flat tool is then used to draw the solution over the gage, in the direction of, and beyond, the channel's zero depth (Fig. 2). In this way, the solution coats or fills the channels, but leaves particulate matter only at those depths of the channel which are equal to the size of the particulate matter (Fig. 3).

The gage is now photographed using low light level, long-time exposure darkfield photography, i.e., with the camera directly above the gage and with the camera lens' axis vertical, as side-lighting floods the gage (Fig. 4).

The resulting photograph can be visually analyzed, or, alternatively, can be analyzed with a computer-assisted image analyzer.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page c...