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Dry Development of High Resolution, High Sensitivity Electron Beam And/Or X-Ray Monomolecular Resist Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048761D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Czornyj, G: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described here is a method for developing images which have been imparted to ultrathin (2.5 to about 100 nm thick) resist materials, built up from ion beam X-ray or E-beam exposed monomolecular films such as described by Barraud, Rosilio and Ruaudel-Texier in the articles "Recent Improvements in Monomolecular Resists," pp.99-100 and "Polymerized Monomolecular Layers: A New Class of Ultrathin Resins for Microlithography," pp.91 to 98, both in Thin Solid Film 68, 1980. Specifically, this method avoids the use of potentially hazardous solvent systems in the development process. This is achieved by means of thermal or "dry development" of the pattern.

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Dry Development of High Resolution, High Sensitivity Electron Beam And/Or X-Ray Monomolecular Resist Materials

Described here is a method for developing images which have been imparted to ultrathin (2.5 to about 100 nm thick) resist materials, built up from ion beam X-ray or E-beam exposed monomolecular films such as described by Barraud, Rosilio and Ruaudel-Texier in the articles "Recent Improvements in Monomolecular Resists," pp.99-100 and "Polymerized Monomolecular Layers: A New Class of Ultrathin Resins for Microlithography," pp.91 to 98, both in Thin Solid Film 68, 1980. Specifically, this method avoids the use of potentially hazardous solvent systems in the development process. This is achieved by means of thermal or "dry development" of the pattern. Other advantages are the simplicity of the process in that, on the one hand, it eliminates multi-step processing and, on the other hand, it makes possible property improvements which in conventional wet development systems tend to degrade resolution. These are adhesion failure, swelling, cracking of films, and pin-hole formation after solvent development.

In the process here a monomolecular resist material, which has been exposed to electron beams, is placed in a vacuum chamber and is then heated to just below the flow/melt point of the resist material which has been cross-linked by exposure to the incident electron beam (resist areas not exposed to the electron beam remain monomeric and therefore have a much lower melting point than the cross-linked material). As a result of the heating process...