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Browse Prior Art Database

Flat Ribbon Pulling Apparatus

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048776D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kim, KM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This flat ribbon crystal pulling apparatus, by virtue of the rectangular configuration of the graphite susceptor and one-turn RF load coil, provides a substantially uniform temperature distribution both across the width of the top of the die and in the miniscus/sheet growth interface, resulting in the ability to substantially increase the width of the crystal.

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Flat Ribbon Pulling Apparatus

This flat ribbon crystal pulling apparatus, by virtue of the rectangular configuration of the graphite susceptor and one-turn RF load coil, provides a substantially uniform temperature distribution both across the width of the top of the die and in the miniscus/sheet growth interface, resulting in the ability to substantially increase the width of the crystal.

An apparatus for producing ribbon-shaped crystals by the capillary-assisted shaping technique is described in U.S. Patent 4,116,641. The patented apparatus is basically cylindrical in shape and employs auxiliary heaters or inert gas cooling jets to achieve a uniform temperature distribution across the die face when wider ribbon crystals are drawn.

In the illustrated apparatus the single turn RF coil of a rectangular cross- section surrounds the graphite susceptor which, in turn, supports the crucible containing the molten silicon. The die plates have a curved top surface, higher at the ends and lower in the middle, and generally truncated tapered die faces. The heat shields have flat oval openings to permit greater heat loss at the center of the die with respect to the ends.

With this rectangular configuration and the one-turn RF coil, the temperature distribution across the die face is maintained at about 10 degrees C for a 100 mm die width, as opposed to a 97 degree C temperature difference for the cylindrical structure without supplemental compensating heaters or cooling jet...