Browse Prior Art Database

Semi-Automatic Leadering Feature For A Typewriter

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048832D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hanft, RF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Semi-automatic leadering logic for an electronic typewriter causes a series of dots or dashes to be printed between a printing position at which the operator depresses a special preselected combination of keys and the last preceding position at which a character printing operation occurred.

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Semi-Automatic Leadering Feature For A Typewriter

Semi-automatic leadering logic for an electronic typewriter causes a series of dots or dashes to be printed between a printing position at which the operator depresses a special preselected combination of keys and the last preceding position at which a character printing operation occurred.

In preparing tables such as tables of contents that include columns of information that are widely separated, it is common practice to insert dots or dashes (leadering) to allow a person reading the table to conveniently shift attention between corresponding entries in the respective columns. In the following description of a system for producing leadering characters, a text processing system is assumed that introduces space codes in a line memory for all print position shifts that do not involve printing (even those shifts that result from a tab operation).

Referring to the figure, a string of key entries (at 10) results in text code additions to line storage end a corresponding shift in carrier (printing) position. At 12, chord keying occurs to initiate a leadering operation, and responsively the leadering logic stores the current carrier position (at 14) in a location register (not shown). A code for a leadering character (e.g., a dot or dash) is then stored in line memory (at 16) and a flag (ALT) is set (at 18). The line memory pointer is then decremented (at 20) to correspond to the preceding carrier position (effectively a backspacing in line memory). A test is performed (at 22) to determine if a space code is stored in line memory at the location...