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Using Nitrogen Carried Water Vapor To Oxidize Si-SiO(2) To Form DEIS In Non-Volatile Memory Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048887D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DiMaria, DJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The conventional technique used in fabricating dual electron injector structure (DEIS) stacks in non-volatile memory devices is by successive CVD (chemical vapor deposition) layers of Si-SiO(2), SiO(2), and Si-Si0 (2). Due to the "porous" nature of CVD SiO(2), the minimum thickness of the SiO(2) layer is probably 100 angstroms. Also, charge trapping in the CVD SiO(2) layer decreases the cyclability (write and erase) and causes degradation of a non-volatile memory device having a DEIS.

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Using Nitrogen Carried Water Vapor To Oxidize Si-SiO(2) To Form DEIS In Non-Volatile Memory Devices

The conventional technique used in fabricating dual electron injector structure (DEIS) stacks in non-volatile memory devices is by successive CVD (chemical vapor deposition) layers of Si-SiO(2), SiO(2), and Si-Si0 (2). Due to the "porous" nature of CVD SiO(2), the minimum thickness of the SiO(2) layer is probably 100 angstroms. Also, charge trapping in the CVD SiO(2) layer decreases the cyclability (write and erase) and causes degradation of a non- volatile memory device having a DEIS.

If the SiO(2) layer in the DEIS can be made sufficiently thin so that charges can tunnel out instead of being trapped in the SiO(2) layer, there would be no degradation of the DEIS. The subsequent increase in the cyclability could meet the requirements for a pure non-volatile random access memory.

A technique to grow a very thin SiO(2) layer ( approximately 50 A degree thick) is to thermally oxidize the first Si-SiO(2) layer by nitrogen carried water vapor. The advantages of this technique are:
1. Denser and pore-free oxide due to the existence of few

or no pores (voids) in thin

wet oxide (pores exist in dry oxide). The wet

oxide has better (higher voltage and tighter) breakdown

distributions.
2. More controllable oxide growth rate. Using nitrogen

carried water vapor (approximately

1000 ppm), the oxidation rate is slowed down

and precise oxide thickness can be obtained.

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