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Browse Prior Art Database

Open Mosaic Plot

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048890D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Appel, A: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A computer graphic technique which enables the creation of multilayer mathematical surfaces at low cost is described. Utilizing this technique, surfaces are represented by patches which do not close up, and internal details can be visualized.

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Open Mosaic Plot

A computer graphic technique which enables the creation of multilayer mathematical surfaces at low cost is described. Utilizing this technique, surfaces are represented by patches which do not close up, and internal details can be visualized.

Occasionally, in engineering and more often in science, three dimensional (3D) scenes are to be drawn where layers, or surfaces within surfaces are encountered. Pictures are sometimes needed where only partial obstruction of hidden details is desired. Such pictures are usually very expensive to create. What made these techniques more expensive was the necessity for global testing to see where and when visibility was affected, and levels of visibility had to be considered in the cross-sectional pictures, new surfaces had to be created, and special drawing symbols were needed.

The method described enables very economical creation of see through plots of two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) scenes, and also proposes a new style of area fill which can prove useful in many situations. This new technique is referred to as 'open mosaic'.

Conventional 3D mathematic surfaces may appear as shown in Figs. 1 and
2. What is drawn are patches of 3 or 4 sides. Obscuring surfaces are assumed to be triangular or 4-sided planes, which close up to form the continuous surface or object. The open mosaic assumes the patches do not close up (Figs. 3 and
4). The virtues of the open mosaic approach are: Both the close and...