Browse Prior Art Database

Laser Induced Color Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048943D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pawletko, JP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In general, leuco dyes can be converted to their color form by the application of energy. It is also known that leuco dyes of different colors have different thresholds of energy at different wavelengths. By selectively taking advantage of these characteristics, a laser-activated color printer can be implemented.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Laser Induced Color Printing

In general, leuco dyes can be converted to their color form by the application of energy. It is also known that leuco dyes of different colors have different thresholds of energy at different wavelengths. By selectively taking advantage of these characteristics, a laser-activated color printer can be implemented.

A three-color leuco dye system would be impregnated in a recording medium. The three primary subtractive colors of cyan, magenta and yellow would be used. Each of the three leuco dyes would convert to its color form at a different wavelength and energy. Consequently, it is only necessary to impart the required specific threshold energy at the proper wavelength to a small spot on the recording medium to obtain a dot of a desired color.

By using the highly collimated light of a laser LED (light emitting diode), three solid state lasing devices of the three desired outputs for the three primary colors can be focused onto the same point on the recording medium to produce the necessary combinations for any desired color pixel (picture element).

The LEDs, due to their small size as LSI or VLSI (large-scale or very large- scale integration) devices, can be placed rather close together in a very small volume. A plurality of these solid-state lasing diode groups, three per pixel, can then be grouped together in an array to completely cover the full width of the recording medium. Hence, it is thereafter only necessary to feed the recording medium...