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Electroformed Print Head Array

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000048944D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 3 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pittwood, DG: AUTHOR

Abstract

The reduced energy levels required by the write electrodes of certain electrolytic printers has led to a search for the best methods of implementing an integrated print head that can take full advantage of this reduction while increasing the printing element density of the head. Such an electrode implemented print head would be useful in printers, chart recorders, facsimile devices and other hard copy graphic and character print out that can employ such a high resolution, low energy type of integrated print head.

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Electroformed Print Head Array

The reduced energy levels required by the write electrodes of certain electrolytic printers has led to a search for the best methods of implementing an integrated print head that can take full advantage of this reduction while increasing the printing element density of the head. Such an electrode implemented print head would be useful in printers, chart recorders, facsimile devices and other hard copy graphic and character print out that can employ such a high resolution, low energy type of integrated print head.

Figs. 1a, 1b and 1c show the principal elements of the print head 10, which are fabricated as follows. An array of center electrodes 12 is electroformed from nickel to the configuration shown in Fig. 1a. This array is then suitably masked and sputtered, evaporation or paste coated with ruthenium dioxide (RuO(2)) to produce a wear pad 14 at the top of each electrode button 16. A flat nickel ground sheet 18 is etched to produce thru-holes 20 of slightly larger diameter than the electrode buttons, and thereafter is also coated with ruthenium dioxide. The discontinuous pattern of the oxide coating is used to prevent curl of the part due to the thermal mismatch between the nickel and the ruthenium dioxide.

The ground plane and electrode array are laminated together in registration, here using a pre-punched dry adhesive sheet 22, so that the electrode buttons are concentric with the through-holes formed in the ground plane, as depicted in Fig. 4. The film adhesive is applied between ground plane and electrode array, thereafter thermally cured during lamination to produce a homogeneous dielectric throughout the space between the array and the ground plane, as...