Browse Prior Art Database

Reduction Of Degassing Interference In An Alkalinity Analyzer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000049005D
Original Publication Date: 1982-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lozier, RG: AUTHOR

Abstract

A continuous alkalinity analyzer conventionally incorporates ion selective electrodes for the method of detection. The sample stream reacts with a buffered reagent stream which has a fixed pH of (see original). The alkalinity in the sample stream changes the pH of the reagent. This change is detected by the analyzer's measuring electrode, which in this case is a conventional pH electrode. When the alkalinity in the sample is due mainly to carbonates, such as calcium carbonate, degassing of CO occurs since the reagent is acidic. The presence of CO results in the formation of tiny air bubbles. The air bubbles upon contact with the tip of the pH electrode cause interference in the form of unstable and drifty readings. This is undesirable where the monitor may be alarmed or designated to perform automatic control.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 85% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Reduction Of Degassing Interference In An Alkalinity Analyzer

A continuous alkalinity analyzer conventionally incorporates ion selective electrodes for the method of detection. The sample stream reacts with a buffered reagent stream which has a fixed pH of (see original). The alkalinity in the sample stream changes the pH of the reagent. This change is detected by the analyzer's measuring electrode, which in this case is a conventional pH electrode. When the alkalinity in the sample is due mainly to carbonates, such as calcium carbonate, degassing of CO occurs since the reagent is acidic. The presence of CO results in the formation of tiny air bubbles. The air bubbles upon contact with the tip of the pH electrode cause interference in the form of unstable and drifty readings. This is undesirable where the monitor may be alarmed or designated to perform automatic control. To minimize the problem a reaction heater is incorporated into the analyzer. The drawing shows the position of the reaction heater in respect to the overall fluidic pattern of the analyzer. The sample enters the reaction heater immediately after mixing with the reagent. The heater is designed so that the sample must flow through a series of coils which are around the heater element.

As the sample is heated, the rate of reaction of CO(2) increases. The bubble trap is positioned at the exit port of the heater to remove the bubbles. An extra pump tube is required for the bubble trap. Although the he...